Latest Posts

Faculty today

Student evaluations as customer satisfaction surveys

By Terry Hébert, Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Are student evaluations the best way for professors/lecturers etc. to get helpful and critical feedback on their teaching skills? In my time at two universities, after being evaluated by a large number of students- what have I taken home from these evaluations? Frankly, not as much as the few times that I have been evaluated by my peers- which must be solicited and can be time consuming. Read more –>

Faculty today

Back to Dewey

By Jennie Ferris, Teaching and Learning Services. He is among the key educational philosophers of the late 20th Century, and until recently, I confess that I had only read about John Dewey and his ideas, and had not actually read his work itself. When I finally read Experience and education, I was impressed by how the themes, questions and challenges that he addresses remain relevant today, 75 years after the book was first published. Read more –>

Events

Sept. 13 workshop for faculty: Bringing research into the undergraduate classroom

As an instructor of undergraduate courses, have you wondered how to get students to ask better questions or to understand that knowledge is not black and white? In this interactive workshop, you will meet the Inquiry Network, a group of McGill professors who have been tackling questions like this and have created a framework for enhancing students’ understanding of the relationship between research and course content. Read more –>

Events

Aug. 28 workshop for faculty: Writing effective reference letters for student fellowships

Professors are often asked by students to write reference letters for funding opportunities. This interactive session is designed to help you answer questions such as: Are you obliged to write a reference letter if asked by a student and how might you respond if you are not supportive? How much lead time should you expect in order to write a reference letter? What information should be provided by the student? Read more –>

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Faculty today

Hear this! Podcasts as an assessment tool in higher education

As a University Professor, I’m always experimenting with new ways to assess students in my undergraduate classes. This can be a significant challenge with larger class sizes, especially since I’m not a fan of multiple choice style questions. It’s nice to be able to assess students on the basis of how they are integrating and synthesizing course content, and traditionally this is done with longer-format essay-type assignments. These long-format assignments are great, but do take a tremendous amount of time and energy to grade, and I seldom feel I can give enough time to each written assignment… Read more –>

Universities today

Librarians in the Classroom

University students and faculty may not think of librarians as teachers, but increasingly the role of librarians is shifting from reference and book providers to active educators.[1] In the past, instruction in the library, often referred to as bibliographic instruction, served to orient students and other users to the organization of materials within the library’s collection. Now, the library is refocusing from a collection-centered model to a user-centered model, where instruction is tailored to the needs of the user… Read more –>