10 Ways to Encourage Course Evaluation Participation


Mercury Course Evaluations are now open to students until December 21 (default period) or until December 7 (for units following the condensed evaluation period). Course evaluations are an important source of feedback to help you learn what is working well in your courses and how you can improve them. They are also a component of the teaching dossier, and are reviewed for the annual merit process.

Professors often express concern about response rates, and so we wanted to share some strategies that you can implement to encourage your students to complete their evaluations. Teaching and Learning Services undertakes numerous University-wide strategies, but encouragement that comes directly from professors has been very effective. Here are 10 things that you can do to encourage student participation in this important process: Continue reading 10 Ways to Encourage Course Evaluation Participation

Is Supervision about Teaching or Research?


In fact, it’s both!

Studies in supervision practice have found a connection between a mentor-model of supervision and better research outcomes.  On the surface, the investment in time and energy into new supervisees may seem like a one-directional cost for many supervisors.  However, some supervision research has shown that the original investment into teaching students about good research techniques pays off in the end. Continue reading Is Supervision about Teaching or Research?

Bringing Social Media into myCourses: Embedded Twitter Feeds


At Teaching and Learning Services, I work as a Learning Technology Consultant and help instructors with incorporating learning technology, such as myCourses and clickers, into their courses.

Last week, I attended Chris Buddle’s workshop “Using Social Media Tools in Teaching and Learning.” This had me thinking: if instructors are using social media tools as vital components of a course, and if we think of myCourses as an extension of the classroom, then how can we bring these together?

Continue reading Bringing Social Media into myCourses: Embedded Twitter Feeds

Social media in teaching: picking the right tool for the job


Now that we’ve examined the arguments for using social media in the classroom, and discussed some of the practical considerations, it’s time to talk about the tools themselves. There is a befuddling array of social media tools from which an instructor could choose. Even the more web-savvy among us can be intimidated by all the choices! How should we go about identifying and selecting the right tool for the job? To make this discussion a little more straightforward, we’ll limit it to include what we would consider our “Top Ten Tools”. These are user-friendly, well-supported, free, include opportunities for information-sharing/networking, and are commonly used. Continue reading Social media in teaching: picking the right tool for the job

Create interactive images with Thinglink


I just ran across a very interesting tool for creating interactive images. Thinglink is a “freemium” tool (most features are free for educators) that allows you to upload any image and add “hot spots” linked to text, websites, videos, recorded audio and much more.  I created an example for Education 627, one of McGill’s first Active Learning Classrooms. Continue reading Create interactive images with Thinglink

My farmer, my teacher


Earlier this fall I spent an afternoon in my farmers’ field digging up carrots. Yes, I am part of community supported agriculture (CSA) – this particular group is led by a couple whose farm is in the outskirts of Montreal. Every week, I enjoy deliveries of fresh, local, organic and DELICIOUS vegetables. However, this Sunday was different. Instead of bringing my canvas bags to the neighborhood drop-off point to pick up my veggies, I headed across the bridge to where the vegetables are actually grown. Continue reading My farmer, my teacher

Handwritten notes vs. laptop notes: Does one method afford deeper learning than the other?


Apparently, yes.

HandwritingA study entitled The pen is mightier than the keyboard: Advantages of longhand over laptop note taking (Mueller & Oppenheimer, 2014) compared the two methods in different experiments. Findings suggest that when tested for factual recall, student performance was about the same for both note-taking methods; however, students who took handwritten notes fared better when tested for conceptual learning. Continue reading Handwritten notes vs. laptop notes: Does one method afford deeper learning than the other?

Discussing what matters in higher education.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 120 other followers